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New PDF release: Loud Hawk: the United States versus the American Indian

By Kenneth S. Stern

Loud Hawk: the us as opposed to the yankee Indian circulate is the tale of a felony case that started with the arrest of six participants of the yank Indian flow in Portland, Oregon, in 1975. The case didn't finish until eventually 1988, after 13 years of pretrial litigaion. It stands because the longest pretrial case in U.S. history.This is a dramatic tale of individuals and of presidency abuse of the criminal approach, of judicial braveness and bone-chilling bigotry. it's an insider’s view of the felony procedure and of the stipulations in Indian state that led as much as and Wounded Knee.

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Kenneth S. Stern's Loud Hawk: the United States versus the American Indian PDF

Loud Hawk: the us as opposed to the yankee Indian move is the tale of a felony case that started with the arrest of six individuals of the yank Indian stream in Portland, Oregon, in 1975. The case didn't finish till 1988, after 13 years of pretrial litigaion. It stands because the longest pretrial case in U.

Additional info for Loud Hawk: the United States versus the American Indian Movement

Sample text

That night I watched a report of Indians arrested in eastern Oregon. Something bothered me. The way the officials and the news people reported it, a shootout made little sense. The story had Trooper Griffiths stopping the motor home. Then two women, a baby, and a man emerged. The officer and the occupants must have been close together. Then the man dashed for the highway fence and in the process of jumping over it, shot at the cop. The shootout started. In Ontario. I could picture it all. Less than three months before, I had driven cross country and spent my first Oregon night in Ontario.

It took a moment to realize that the gas gun worked too well. The projectile easily sliced through the rear windshield and emerged through the front windshield. Some eastern Oregon prairie dog or rabbit down the road was getting gassednot anyone who still happened to be in the motor home. Ammirati asked if the Ontario police had any other rounds. "No," said Randy Cook. " "Try it," Ammirati ordered. " Ammirati inspected it with a blank stare, handed it back to Cook, and pointed at the motor home.

The activists I had admired growing upthe draft resisters, the antiwar protesters, the civil rights workerswere the ones I wanted to represent. People who fought the status quo and challenged society to let go of archaic and dangerous notions frequently needed a lawyer's help. People who resisted segregation ended up in southern jails. People who fought to end the war in Vietnam were arrested everywhere. Minorities and women victimized by discrimination needed attorneys. The seventies were the end of an era of activism, and I, Ken Stern, wanted to serve the remaining activists, to help those in trouble stay on the streets and to use the theater of criminal trials to educate all who would listen.

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