NiceWords Library

Civil Rights Liberties

Get Inventing the "American Way": The Politics of Consensus from PDF

By Wendy L. Wall

This can be a big e-book that reconceptualizes the character of contemporary politics. the conventional interpretation privileges the construction of an American team spirit that resulted from the earliest trials of the chilly warfare and gave upward push to a selected model of yankee exceptionalism. That exceptionalism combined civil faith, affluence, and middle values to create the consensus of a contemporary the USA as mirrored within the post-Cold battle period. the writer without delay demanding situations this interpretation and situates the yankee personality and consensus in an previous period, the crises of the good melancholy, emerging Marxism and fascism, and a splintering society being torn aside by way of monetary worry. during this challenge, Wall asserts, americans of all political persuasions, fiscal backgrounds, religions, and ethnic and racial origins latched onto a unmarried unifying "American method" to rescue the U.S. test. phrases resembling democracy, loose company, the Judeo-Christian culture, and patriotism received new which means because the principal set of assumptions of the period. They received credence as a way of making sure nationwide coherence and identification. this can be a well-crafted thesis that provides a tremendous new point of view.

Show description

Read or Download Inventing the "American Way": The Politics of Consensus from the New Deal to the Civil Rights Movement PDF

Similar civil rights & liberties books

Download e-book for kindle: Inventing the "American Way": The Politics of Consensus from by Wendy L. Wall

This can be an immense publication that reconceptualizes the character of contemporary politics. the conventional interpretation privileges the production of an American team spirit that resulted from the earliest trials of the chilly struggle and gave upward push to a selected model of yank exceptionalism. That exceptionalism combined civil faith, affluence, and center values to create the consensus of a contemporary the US as mirrored within the post-Cold warfare period.

Read e-book online Loud Hawk: the United States versus the American Indian PDF

Loud Hawk: the U.S. as opposed to the yank Indian stream is the tale of a felony case that started with the arrest of six contributors of the yankee Indian move in Portland, Oregon, in 1975. The case didn't finish until eventually 1988, after 13 years of pretrial litigaion. It stands because the longest pretrial case in U.

Extra resources for Inventing the "American Way": The Politics of Consensus from the New Deal to the Civil Rights Movement

Example text

Moreover, unlike the elites who had long shaped public conceptions of “America,” relatively few were Nordic or Protestant. The vast majority were Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, or Jewish, although some practiced Buddhism, Islam, Shintoism, and assorted other religions. S. cities. ” During the war, half a million southern blacks journeyed north to take newly available jobs in the metalworking shops, automobile plants, and packing houses of cities such as New York, Chicago, and Detroit. Black Americans occupied the lowest rungs on the industrial ladder.

S. 50 In the past, domestic anti-Semitism had primarily taken the form of social or economic discrimination, but many of the new organizations—which boasted names such as the Silver Shirts, the American Nationalist Federation, Defenders of the Christian Faith, and the Knights of the White Camelia—resorted to violence. Some benefited from foreign support, even as they wrapped themselves in the mantle of Americanism. One such organization was the German American Bund. Founded in 1936 by a Detroit autoworker, Fritz Kuhn, the Bund held mass rallies marked by uniforms and histrionics that eerily resembled those found in Munich and Nuremburg.

10 This faith in cooperation—together with the assumption that Americans had harmonious interests—had shaped New Deal approaches to the economic crisis ever since Roosevelt’s inauguration in March 1933. 11 New Dealers shunned solutions aimed at specific ethnic and racial groups even as they sought to administer federal programs evenhandedly. When Harold Ickes traveled to Atlanta in October 1934 to dedicate the first low-cost housing project for blacks, he did not single out Jim Crow for denunciation.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.49 of 5 – based on 24 votes