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By Steven Lecce, Neil McArthur, Arthur Schafer

This e-book is predicated upon a lecture sequence that came about among September 2013 and will 2014 to inaugurate the recent Canadian Museum for Human Rights. It brings jointly essentially the most influential modern thinkers at the conception and perform of human rights.

summary: This ebook relies upon a lecture sequence that happened among September 2013 and will 2014 to inaugurate the hot Canadian Museum for Human Rights. It brings jointly essentially the most influential modern thinkers at the conception and perform of human rights

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The reason why the rights and liberties enu­ merated in, for example, documents such as the UDHR, the US Bill of Rights, and the US Constitution, are so important is that they are tools of an ethical life—​their intent is to free people to do that all-​ important task of thinking about a life worth living. If we lacked that important freedom, the moral point behind the idea of rights would be unintelligible, and it would not matter if an imposed orthodoxy prevented people from sorting out life’s challenges for themselves.

Life cannot be lived at the dictate of an authority, as though there were only one kind of good life for all of us. The Enlightenment recognized two complementary and mutu­ ally reinforcing truths. First, we share a common nature—​we are essentially social creatures. We need to be part of communities, we need to give and receive friendship and affection, and we rely on the support of other people. These are some of our fundamental needs. None of us (or very few of us anyway) likes to be lonely, cold or hungry, tortured, or in pain, or abandoned and neglected when we are in pain and in need of comfort.

He says that while the concept seems foreign to the practice of law, it 15 16 Introduction is central to other areas of our lives. Many people involved in public life have love as one of their chief motivations. He points out that many other concepts that are equally abstract and elusive, such as life, liberty, security, equality, and freedom, all have an established place in Western law. For Borrows, the Canadian government has an obligation to rec­ ognize the place of love in the law, because love was a key element in the treaties it made with aboriginal peoples.

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